The association between informal caregiving and exit from employment among older workers: prospective findings from the UK Household Longitudinal Study

Publication type

Journal Article

Published in

Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences

Authors

Ewan Carr, Emily T. Murray, Paola Zaninotto, Dorina Cadar, Jenny Head, Stephen Stansfeld and Mai Stafford

Publication date

Summary

Objective: This study investigated associations between informal caregiving and exit from paid employment among older workers in the United Kingdom. Method: Information on caregiving and work status for 8,473 older workers (aged 50–75 years) was drawn from five waves of Understanding Society (2009–2014). We used discrete-time survival models to estimate the associations of caring intensity and type on the probability of exiting paid work (from >0 to 0 hours/week) in the following year. Models were stratified by sex and working hours, and adjusted for age, self-rated health, long-standing illness, occupation, and partner’s employment status. Results: No association was found between caregiving intensity and exit from paid work. Full-time employees who provided care within the household (women and men) or cared for a partner/spouse (women only) more likely to stop working, compared to those not providing care. Women who entered a caregiving role (more than 10 hours/week) were between 2.64 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46, 4.79) and 4.46 (95% CI: 2.53, 7.88) times more likely to exit work (for part-time and full-time workers, respectively), compared to women providing no care. Discussion: This study highlights the onset of caregiving as a key period for older workers. Ensuring that caregiving responsibilities are adequately recognized and supported may help extend working life.

Volume and page numbers

73, 1253-1262

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbw156

ISSN

16

Subjects

Disability, Older People, Labour Market and Caregiving

Notes

Open Access; © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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