Better governance, better access: practising responsible data sharing in the METADAC governance infrastructure

Publication type

Journal Article

Published in

Human Genomics

Authors

Madeleine J. Murtagh, Mwenza T. Blell, Olly W. Butters, Lorraine Cowley, Edward S. Dove, Alissa Goodman, Rebecca L. Griggs, Alison Hall, Nina Hallowell, Meena Kumari, Massimo Mangino, Barbara Maughan, Melinda C. Mills, Joel T. Minion, Tom Murphy, Gillian Prior, Matthew Suderman, Susan M. Ring, Nina T. Rogers, Stephanie J. Roberts, Catherine Van der Straeten, Will Viney, Deborah Wiltshire, Andrew Wong, Neil Walker and Paul R. Burton

Publication date

Summary

Genomic and biosocial research data about individuals is rapidly proliferating, bringing the potential for novel opportunities for data integration and use. The scale, pace and novelty of these applications raise a number of urgent sociotechnical, ethical and legal questions, including optimal methods of data storage, management and access. Although the open science movement advocates unfettered access to research data, many of the UK’s longitudinal cohort studies operate systems of managed data access, in which access is governed by legal and ethical agreements between stewards of research datasets and researchers wishing to make use of them. Amongst other things, these agreements aim to respect the reasonable expectations of the research participants who provided data and samples, as expressed in the consent process. Arguably, responsible data management and governance of data and sample use are foundational to the consent process in longitudinal studies and are an important source of trustworthiness in the eyes of those who contribute data to genomic and biosocial research.

Volume

12:24

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1186/s40246-018-0154-6

ISSN

16

Subjects

Medicine, Science And Technology, Research, Surveys, Biology and Genetics

Notes

Open Access; This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.